From Vines to Twitter: capturing the ‘now’.

Vines create a massive trend throughout the world in just 6 seconds. Only 6 seconds. There are many reasons for this duration. Some can explain that because human attention span has been reduced to no more than 8 seconds so vines can settle down within that amount while others argue that such a short duration is easy to make and people are not hesitant to watch.

Twitter becomes one of the most dominant social networks with a words limit of 140 characters. Just 140. Back to 2006 when it was founded, Twitter was designed to be used via wireless carriers’ text-messaging services with 160-character limit. Therefore, Twitter’s creators took out 20 characters for the user name and there we have the magic number.

Fair enough.

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But both of them developed significantly out of expectation and the above arguments. The reason lies in the nature of their usage: capturing the ‘now’. In order to be instant, you don’t need much. You don’t need to many visuals as well as too many words. Therefore, the success of Twitter comes from its origin: text messages. With just 140 characters, you are able to capture your ‘now’ and let people know. Moreover, others are not hesitant to be able to know your ‘now’ by reading a 140-character tweets, just the same as the text message from you replying their text. And with a whole social site with networks of hundreds or thousands followers, you are able to capture the ‘now’ of the whole world.

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25 thoughts on “From Vines to Twitter: capturing the ‘now’.”

  1. Just a quick grammar check, in the first paragraph it should be ‘hesitate’ not ‘hesitant’. Twitter and Vine are great examples of how users can generate information immediately to their audience however, you haven’t done much to explain citizen journalism and how these social media sites have effected the way we receive our news. The Arab Spring would have been a perfect event to mention since various social media sites became a big part of how protestors shared information about what was occurring in the Middle East: https://mic.com/articles/10642/twitter-revolution-how-the-arab-spring-was-helped-by-social-media#.w2WUFVBXR
    An example was the only thing missing from your post, but I also enjoyed your meme!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I like how you have taken a different angle for this weeks topic, looking closely at twitter and vine as a source for citizen generated content. As you have stated with both these platforms capturing the ‘now’ of the situation at hand does and can be difficult, however it offers a snapshot into what is happening at that given moment with such speed, something that most news corporations may not be able to do. This opens the door further for citizen journalism as we have the power and the sources to not only create content but relay information at a touch of a button. As mentioned in the previous comment the only thing missing in this post is an example of how these two platforms are used when it comes to citizen journalism and the transmission of information. This blog post perfectly puts your point into play with an example to build it up more https://talkingpoliticsjomc.wordpress.com/2013/04/18/citizen-journalism-via-social-media/.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Nice work! You’ve raised some really good points. I agree with some ideas that other comments have suggested. Easy to read post and straight to the point. I think it’s a good point of focus to write about two main examples than briefly skimming over the whole weeks content. Just me! I think a great idea would be adding some vines at the end of this post πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Great blog.
    Due to the fact we are living in an age of ‘informational overload’ we as an audience tend to skim – rather than read. The most attention grabbing headlines conquer and the 6 second content relates to this attention deficit. The point you raised about how the limited character space on twitter is enough to broadcast the trendy and ‘now’ information is also very interesting. Do you think less is more? Or can a limited amount of characters (that seduce audiences in todays attention economy) risk the potential to leave a lot of the relevant content out of the original post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hey there,

      I like it that you raise a question. Personally I think less is more. Even you were right when saying that relevant content might be included, I still think that a huge number of small and short posts will make an actively big picture πŸ˜‰

      Cuong.

      Like

  5. I really liked how you framed this weeks topic around the idea of “being instant.” This is how our world functions today. We all want our information in short and sweet bite sized pockets that we can consume on the go. Vine and Twitter are great examples of this idea and really compliment your idea! Also, your meme really captures the essence of your whole blog post. You could also mention that these platforms are forcing us to think quicker and to express our views within a much shorter time span. Check out this site: (http://wearesocial.com/uk/blog/2013/06/vine-good-bad-ugly) as it elaborates more on the idea of instant conversation online. However, as we begin to learn to think quicker and have a concise point of view, what is this doing to our lifestyle? Do we begin to become complacent with information that delivered quick and not ask questions as to why something happened. Or, will we become cultural gurus as we begin to learn small bits of information about each event, providing us with a rounded world view. All in all, both of these platforms have changed the way that we receive information and the way that we interact with the world and this will keep changing toward the future.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Monique,

      I like the way you linked the ‘instant’ characteristic to another idea. Yeah it is obvious that we want things to be so instant that sometimes we forget to take a deeper look in the way things happen and the meaning underlying. Thanks for your suggested source too ;).

      Cuong.

      Like

  6. The way that you positioned your post this week established the idea that as we have a “information overload” our attention spans are becoming shorter, and in an attention economy, that is scary. The example of the vines and tweets which constrict the amount of time and effort we put into constructing our information is the perfect metaphor for our declining attention span and our world being reliant on the attention economy. Having ‘now’ instead of ‘then’ as a concept for social media is extremely important in the world of the attention economy. The fact that instead of updating our statuses with 1000 words every few minutes, we now use only 140 characters but post in bulk. Here you can find out why twitter is one of the most popular social media sites, one of the reasons is indeed, because of the 140 character word limit. Who would have guessed! (http://www.episerver.com/blog/blog-start/sean-howe/why-has-twitter-become-so-popular-/).

    Great post! I just struggled a little bit when you described the concept of ‘now’ but other than that I love it, your meme was also excellent πŸ™‚

    ~krisesandchrosses~

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hey there,

      I like it that you mention ‘information overload’. Thinking in the way that when millions of people tweet simultaneously about one event and we readers are really truly bombarded with content. Your suggested source is awesome, it adds much to my understanding of Twitter.

      Thanks for your comment
      Cuong.

      Like

  7. I like how you’ve focused on ‘being instant’ as a topic this week, its interesting how us as consumers have a declining attention span. Through the platforms that you mentioned, they are both restricted to limits, twitter being 140 characters and vine being 6 seconds… its interesting to think that these limits are put on because generally, it would not be enough to broadcast an entire news story within 6 seconds. However with citizen journalism, we can take snapshots of events taking place and publish it for the world to see that this thing is actually happening. Twitters character limit is definitely annoying, however when it comes to this idea of citizen journalism, we create instant tweets which are short and succinct to get the word out that this big thing is happening. Its interesting how these limits can actually help tell a bigger story!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hey there

      I really like your argument that the restrictions of 140 characters or 6 seconds seem to be annoying but turn out to be useful, limited turn out to be limitless. All those changes and development are enabled when they are put in the context of citizen journalism, to create an instant and big story.

      Thanks for your comment.
      Cuong.

      Like

  8. Hi!
    I love how your meme raised the idea of a 140-character essay. I feel that this is a brilliant way to capture the new idea of value brought forth by the attention economy. The short attention span argument regarding internet practices is often a negative one, yet I think it’s actually an invaluable skill to be able to express yourself, or your opinions, in a short space. The benefit also expands to the audience; people become more committed and connected when responding to small segments of information rather than larger ones. This idea is discussed in this source (http://www.isaiahhankel.com/short-attention-span).
    – Claire πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Claire

      I like it that you related the problem discussed to the benefit expanding to the audience. It’s obvious that due to shorter attention span, people are more likely to be engaged with as you said, ‘small segments of information’. Thanks for your comment and the suggested source.

      Cuong.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Hey there, this was a really good post! I really enjoyed it – it was well-written, succinct and easy to follow. You have explained this week’s topic really well. I love your examples – Twitter and most particularly, Vine. You’ve made a good point about how both platforms allow individuals to generate short messages to really capture instantaneity and the ‘now’. I never really thought about it but it is an effective way of informing people what’s going on in real time. In fact, in a lot of situations, Twitter breaks the news before mainstream traditional news organisations are able to. Overall, great post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hey Jyotsna

      I agree with you saying that the instant characteristic of both Vines and Twitter is what matters. You see something, you like it, you want to share it, then you have it, capture the ‘now’.

      Thanks for your comment.
      Cuong.

      Like

  10. It took me a second to know what topic this post was on, and I’m not sure if that’s a good or a bad thing? On the one hand I like that you put your own spin on this week blog task, focusing on Vines and Twitter and why they work, but I would also like to have seen you make a direct link to how this is used in making change to journalism.
    Keep up the good work.
    Hayden

    Liked by 1 person

  11. It’s interesting to see that the human attention span has affected the way in which the news is presented or captured then presented to an audience. Using Twitter and Vine in your post as an example was a really good idea and captured what you were saying quite well. Your blog post was well written to me and worked really well with your meme.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Oct10 I like this web site its a master peace ! Glad I noticed this on google. &#aar0;I2r8tion2lly held truths may be more harmful than reasoned errors.” by Thomas Huxley.

    Like

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